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From the Editor

Larry J. Shuman
Editor, AEE
Senior Associate Dean University of Pittsburgh
shuman@pitt.edu

This issue contains eight articles that document “advances” in engineering education. The papers cover a wide range of topics, with focus ranging from introductory first year courses to senior capstone design. The papers present creative ways of student learning and assessment, including the use of webpages and other media to better understand complex concepts. The papers address such currently “hot” topics as the blended/flipped classroom, combining ethics with design, sustainability and entrepreneurship. Below is a short overview of each paper–happy, and productive reading! (click PDF to continue reading).

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Table of Contents

  1. Thermodynamics in High Rhythms and Rhymes: Creative Ways of Knowing in Engineering
    Diana Bairaktarova, Michele Eodice
  2. Teaching Ethics as Design
    Robert Kirkman, Katherine Fu, Bumsoo Lee
  3. Updating Assessment Styles: Website Development Rather Than Report Writing for Project Based Learning Courses
    Nicola Brown
  4. Influence of End Customer Exposure on Product Design within an Epistemic Game Environment
    Matthew R. Markovetz, Renee M. Clark, Zachari Swiecki, Golnaz Arastoopour Irgens, Naomi C. Chesler, David W. Shaffer, Cheryl A. Bodnar
  5. Large Lecture Transformation: Improving Student Engagement and Performance through In-class Practice in an Electrical Circuits Course
    Jae-Eun Russell, Mark S. Andersland, Sam Van Horne, John Gikonyo, Logan Sloan
  6. You Be the Judge: When Competitions Employ an Engineering Design Rubric
    Gail Goldberg
  7. Survey Tools for Faculty to Quickly Assess Multidisciplinary Team Dynamics in Capstone Courses
    Ryan Solnosky, Joshua Fairchild
  8. Utilizing Civil Engineering Senior Design Capstone Projects to Evaluate Students’ Sustainability Education across Engineering Curriculum
    Claire L. A. Dancz, Kevin J. Ketchman, Rebekah D. Burke, Troy A. Hottle, Kristen Parrish, Melissa M. Bilec, Amy E. Landis

From the Editor

Larry J. Shuman
Editor, AEE
Senior Associate Dean University of Pittsburgh
shuman@pitt.edu

This marks the 20th issue of Advances. It features nine peer-reviewed articles and our first book review. The authors collectively come from fifteen different institutions. These include a number whose faculty typically appear in the engineering education literature, including Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Duke, Iowa State, North Carolina State, Colorado School of Mines, Georgia Tech, Arizona State and George Mason as well as less well known schools: Wartburg College, University of Toledo, Roger Williams, The Citadel, James Madison, Southern Illinois and the University of Northern Iowa. It is being able to see articles by faculty from this latter group of institutions that is particularly gratifying, because it substantiates a reason for founding the journal; that is, providing an outlet for the broader spectrum of engineering faculty to publish significant classroom achievements.… (click PDF to continue reading).

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Table of Contents

  1. Influence of an Education Abroad Program on the Intercultural Sensitivity of STEM Undergraduates: A Mixed Methods Study
    Chrysanthe Demetry, Richard F. Vaz
  2. Selling Technical Sales to Engineering Learners
    Daniel P. Bumblauskas, Adam R. Carberry, David P. Sly
  3. Intelligent Tutoring System Using Decision Based Learning for Thermodynamic Phase Diagrams
    Mathew Hagge, Mostafa Amin-Naseri, John Jackman, Enruo Guo, Stephen Gilbert, Gloria Starns, Leann Faidley
  4. Effectiveness of Just In Time Teaching on Student Achievement in an Introductory Thermodynamics Course
    Matthew W. Liberatore, Rachel M. Morrish, Charles R. Vestal
  5. Modeling as an Engineering Habit of Mind and Practice
    Matthew D. Lammi, Cameron D. Denson
  6. A Rubric to Analyze Student Abilities to Engage in Sustainable Design
    Mary Katherine Watson, Elise Barrella, Thomas A. Wall, Caroline Noyes, Michael Rodgers
  7. A Mixed Learning Approach to Integrating Digital Signal Processing Laboratory Exercises into a Non-Lab Junior Year DSP Course
    Benjamin D. McPheron, Charles V. Thangaraj, Charles R. Thomas
  8. Volunteer Expert Readers: Drawing on the University Community to Provide Professional Feedback for Engineering Student Writers
    Cary Moskovitz
  9. How Student Written Communication Skills Benefit During Participation in an Industry-Sponsored Civil Engineering Capstone Course
    Ryan Fries, Brad Cross, Jianpeng Zhou, Chad Verbais
  10. Book Review: Designing and Using Effective Learning Environments
    Aditya Johri

From the Editor

Larry J. Shuman
Editor, AEE
Senior Associate Dean University of Pittsburgh
shuman@pitt.edu

Over the approximately quarter century that I have been involved with engineering education research, we have witnessed a number of major initiatives and pedagogical changes. These include the integrated curricula first introduced at Rose-Hulman and Drexel by Jeff Froyd and Eli Fromm respectively; the NSF undergraduate engineering education coalitions; a major focus on active in cooperative learning led by Karl Smith among others; an interest in learning styles promoted by Rich Felder and Rebecca Brent; and the development and spread of concept inventories as a means of assessing learning. More recently we have seen an increased focus on project based learning, student centered learning, distance learning, and MOOCs. Now, one of the most rapidly spreading innovations is the flipped, blended, hybrid or inverted classroom, which is the focus of this issue.

Guest edited by Lorena Barba (George Washington University), Autar Kaw (University of South Florida) and Joseph Le Doux (Georgia Tech and Emory University), the issue features eight papers that explore the various aspects of “flipping.” As the guest editors point out: In the flipped classroom, the students come prepared for the in-class session having read texts, watched a video, and completed homework problems.… (click PDF to continue reading).

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Table of Contents

  1. Guest Editorial: Flipped Classrooms in STEM
    Lorena A. Barba, Autar Kaw, Joseph M. LeDoux
  2. Effects of In-class Hands-On Laboratories in a Large Enrollment, Multiple Section Blended Linear Circuits Course
    Bonnie H. Ferri, Aldo A. Ferri, David M. Majerich, Amanda G. Madden
  3. The Problem Solving Studio: An Apprenticeship Environment for Aspiring Engineers
    Joseph M. LeDoux, Alisha A. Waller
  4. Implementing and Assessing a Flipped Classroom Model for First-Year Engineering Design
    Ann Saterbak, Tracy Volz, Matthew Wettergreen
  5. Flipping Engineering Courses: A School Wide Initiative
    Renee M. Clark, Mary Besterfield-Sacre, Daniel Budny, Karen M. Bursic, William W. Clark, Bryan A. Norman, Robert S. Parker, John F. Patzer II, William S. Slaughter
  6. Comparing the Effectiveness of Blended, Semi-Flipped, and Flipped Formats in an Engineering Numerical Methods Course
    Renee M. Clark, Autar Kaw, Mary Besterfield-Sacre
  7. Flippin’ Fluid Mechanics – Comparison Using Two Groups
    Donald R. Webster, David M. Majerich, Amanda G. Madden
  8. Evaluation of Hybrid Learning in a Construction Engineering Context: A Mixed-Method Approach
    Aliye Karabulut-Ilgu, Charles Jahren
  9. Flipping Core Courses in the Undergraduate Mechanical Engineering Curriculum: Heat Transfer
    Michael G. Schrlau, Robert J. Stevens, Sara Schley

From the Editor

Larry J. Shuman
Editor, AEE
Senior Associate Dean University of Pittsburgh
shuman@pitt.edu

This issue, envisioned and nurtured by Aditya Johri (George Mason University) and Mihaela Vorvoreanu and Krishna Madhavan (Purdue University) focuses on the need to share data among the greater research community. The issue consists of eight invited papers plus a study by the guest editors. While sharing data intuitively makes sense, as the papers point out, it has not always happened, and among engineering education researchers, there is much catching up to do compared to other scientific fields. However, we are at a point in time, where the potential for sharing has never been better, with calls for “open source” data from both the funding agencies and a growing number of researchers.

In developing this issue, Johri, Vorvoreanu and Madhavan have reached out to colleagues across a wide spectrum of fields, including engineering, to present case studies on data sharing as guides for the engineering education research community. The content of these articles is summarized in their guest editorial….

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Table of Contents

  1. Guest Editorial: Data Sharing in Engineering Education
    Aditya Johri, Mihaela Vorvoreanu, Krishna Madhavan
  2. Data Sharing in Interpretive Engineering Education Research: Challenges and Opportunities from a Research Quality Perspective
    Joachim Walther, Nicola W. Sochacka, Alice L Pawley
  3. Data Sharing from a Policy Perspective
    R. Alan Cheville
  4. Designing for Global Data Sharing, Designing for Educational Transformation
    Robin S. Adams, David Radcliffe, Michael Fosmire
  5. Extending Engineering Practice Research with Shared Qualitative Data
    James Trevelyan
  6. The Multiple-Institution Database for Investigating Engineering Longitudinal Development: An Experiential Case Study of Data Sharing and Reuse
    Matthew W. Ohland, Russell A. Long
  7. Development and Classroom Implementation of an Environmental Data Creation and Sharing Tool
    Daniel S. Brogan, Walter M. McDonald, Vinod K Lohani, Randel L. Dymond, Aaron J. Bradner
  8. Transforming Education Research Through Open Video Data Sharing
    Rick O. Gilmore, Karen E. Adolph, David S. Millman, Andrew Gordon
  9. Data Sharing and Reuse within the Academic Pathways Study
    George Toye, Sheri Sheppard, Helen L. Chen
  10. Perceptions and Practices of Data Sharing in Engineering Education
    Aditya Johri, Seungwon Yang, Mihaela Vorvoreanu, Krishna Madhavan

From the Editor

Larry J. Shuman
Editor, AEE
Senior Associate Dean University of Pittsburgh
shuman@pitt.edu

This issue focuses on innovation and entrepreneurship. It contains a guest editorial from Phil Weilerstein (CEO of VentureWell) and Tom Byers (Professor and Director of the Stanford Technology Venture Program), two individuals, who through their involvement with the NSF funded Pathways to Innovation Program, are due much of the credit for the engineering education community’s recent interest in innovation and entrepreneurship. Their editorial provides important background relative to that current interest including the organizations behind it. The main body of this issue consists of eight peer-reviewed articles that present the current state-of-the-art of entrepreneurship education within engineering programs. Taken together they provide faculty and administrators interested in introducing or expanding innovation and entrepreneurship programs with the background literature, models, and assessments needed to be successful. Also included are two articles on Social Entrepreneurship – an important, and also expanding part of the field that is especially attractive to underrepresented minority and women students.

As described in the paper by Mary Besterfield-Sacre, Sarah Zappe, Angela Shartrand and Kristen Hochstedt, interest in innovation and entrepreneurship among engineering faculty is a very recent phenomena. They cite ASEE’s important study (led by Jack Lohman and Leah Jamison) Innovation with Impact: Creating a Culture for Scholarly and Systematic Innovation in Engineering (2012) that found from a survey of faculty from 110 different departments across 72 engineering schools that incorporating entrepreneurship into the engineering undergraduate curriculum was generally not valued. Specifically, at the undergraduate level, 52% of respondents indicated that entrepreneurship was “not important to an engineering curriculum.” At the graduate level the percentage was even higher.

Besterfield-Sacre and her colleagues go on to report….

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Table of Contents

  1. Guest Editorial: Entrepreneurship and Innovation in
    Engineering Education

    Phil Weilerstein, Tom Byers
  2. Evaluation Of Current Assessment Methods In
    Engineering Entrepreneurship Education

    Senay Purzer, Nicholas Fila, Kavin Nataraja
  3. The Role of Entrepreneurship Program Models and Experiential Activities on Engineering Student Outcomes
    Nathalie Duval-Couetil, Angela Shartrand, Teri Reed
  4. Faculty and Student Perceptions of the Content of Entrepreneurship Courses in Engineering Education
    Mary Besterfield-Sacre, Sarah Zappe, Angela Shartrand, Kirsten Hochstedt
  5. NEWPATH: An Innovative Program to Nurture IT Entrepreneurs
    Neelam Soundarajan, Stephen M. Camp, David Lee, Rajiv Ramnath, Bruce W. Weide
  6. Entrepreneurial Thinking in Interdisciplinary Student Teams
    Xaver Neumeyer, Ann McKenna
  7. What Alumni Value from New Product Development Education: A Longitudinal Study
    Corie L. Cobb, Jonathan Hey, Alice M. Agogino, Sara L. Beckman, Sohyeong Kim
  8. An Educational and Entrepreneurial Ecosystem to Actualize Technology-Based Social Ventures
    Khanjan Mehta, Sarah Zappe, Mary Lynn Brannon, Yu Zhao
  9. Motivations of Women Participating in a Technology-Based Social Entrepreneurship Program
    Rachel Dzombak, Sally Mouakkad, Khanjan Mehta

From the Editor

Larry J. Shuman
Editor, AEE
Senior Associate Dean University of Pittsburgh
shuman@pitt.edu

These eleven papers comprise our 16th issue. With a solid backlog of papers we are now in a position to fulfill our objective of publishing four times per year with ideally ten papers per issue. Including abstracts, we have now had over 850 submissions to AEE. We estimate that approximately 25% of submissions eventually result in published papers. We are able to do this because of the hard work of a dedicated board of associate editors who receive too little credit for their efforts. Mary Besterfield-Sacre, John Chen, Kevin Dahm, Trevor Harding, Gul Kremer, Tom Litzinger, Dan Moore, Tamara Moore, Bill Oakes, Larry Richards, Sheryl Sorby, and BevLee Watford deserve most of the credit for making the process work. They are supported by a large list of reviewers. Even though the entire system is solely dependent on volunteers, we are able to average just over 100 days turn-around time between when the paper is submitted and when the author is notified of a decision.

As AEE matures, we continue to tweak and improve its quality and appeal to the broader engineering education community. While we will also focus on those articles that clearly document an “advance” in engineering education, we have decided to expand our pool of potential articles by expanding our definition to include under “applications” articles that apply the results of rigorous engineering education research in a learning environment. We will also consider a few exemplary articles in which the application may not have been a success, but there is much the engineering and STEM education communities might be able to learn from it. In all cases, the paper must be sufficiently grounded in prior work with a section that summarize the relevant literature. Appropriate methodology and measures should be used to evaluate the “advance” and related research findings. The paper must be well written, and fully cover the topic in an organized manner. Most important, the topic must be relevant and of interest to the broader engineering and/or the STEM education communities, including faculty, researchers, students and administrators.

This issue features eleven papers that cover a wide range of topics….

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Table of Contents

  1. Investigating the Impacts of Design Heuristics on
    Idea Initiation and Development
    Julia Kramer, Shanna R. Daly, Seda Yilmaz, Colleen M. Seifert, Richard Gonzalez
  2. An Engineering Educator’s Decision Support Tool for Improving
    Innovation in Student Design Projects
    Nur Ozge Ozaltin, Mary Besterfield-Sacre, Renee M. Clark
  3. Effectiveness of Adaptive Concept Maps for Promoting Conceptual Understanding: Findings from a Design-Based Case Study of a Learner-Centered Tool
    Jacob Moore, Christopher B. Williams, Christopher North, Aditya Johri, Marie Paretti
  4. What Do Students Experience as Peer Leaders of Learning Teams?
    Erik C. Johnson, Brett A. Robbins, Michael C. Loui
  5. Multidisciplinary “Boot Camp” Training in Cellular Bioengineering to Accelerate Research Immersion for REU Participants
    David I. Shreiber, Prabhas V. Moghe, Charles M. Roth
  6. An Evaluation of a Course that Introduces Undergraduate Students to Authentic Aerospace Engineering Research
    Dennis McLaughlin, Irene B. Mena, Sven Schmitz
  7. Curricular Improvements Through Computation and Experiment Based Learning Modules
    Fazeel Khan, Kumar Singh
  8. Engineering Student Self-Assessment Through Confidence-Based Scoring
    Gigi Yuen-Reed, Kyle B. Reed
  9. Introduction of Sustainability Concepts into Industrial
    Engineering Education: a Modular Approach
    Dima Nazzal, Joseph Zabinski, Alexander Hugar, Debra Reinhart, Waldemar Karwowski, Kaveh Madani
  10. Development And Evaluation of a Mass Conservation Laboratory
    Module in a Microfluidics Environment
    Andrew C. King, Carlos H. Hidrovo
  11. Research and Assessment of Learning Environments through Photoelicitation: Graduate Student Perceptions of Electronics Manufacturing in India
    Catherine G.P. Berdanier, Monica F. Cox

 

From the Editor

Larry J. Shuman
Editor, AEE
Senior Associate Dean University of Pittsburgh
shuman@pitt.edu

This issue consists of eight papers on topics ranging from flipping the classroom to augmented reality. In between are papers on designing devices for the less developed world and a freshman-senior linked capstone design course structure. Papers address biomedical applications, device design, safety, measuring group/team development, problem based learning, and real-world applications. These eight “advances” deal with freshmen through graduate students, and cover a number of the engineering disciplines. The papers come primarily from the U.S. with one from Europe. Together, they should provide a number of ideas that can be used to improve classroom learning.

Stephanie Butler Velegol, Sarah E. Zappe, and Emily Mahoney from Penn State were involved with some of the early experiments in flipping the classroom. Their paper “The Evolution of a Flipped Classroom: Evidence-Based Recommendations” describes experiences in flipping or inverting the course; i.e., lecture material online and viewed outside of class; class time used for problem solving. It also contains a comprehensive review of the literature. They did find that students come to class better prepared to apply the knowledge gained from the short lectures to solve problems or do other activities. In their own experiments in flipping they found that students liked having the flexibility to learn the new concepts on their own time and in their own way, preferring this new pedagogy over the traditional classroom. Students appreciated interacting with the faculty and their classmates during class time. The authors believe that flipping a course allows students the opportunity to become active learners through such activities as problem solving, guest speakers, idea generation, and field trips. They proposed that the flip model can be adapted to fit a variety of course settings….

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Table of Contents

  1. The Evolution of a Flipped Classroom: Evidence-Based Recommendations
    Stephanie Butler Velegol, Sarah E. Zappe, Emily Mahoney
  2. Linking First-Year and Senior Engineering Design Teams: Engaging Early Academic Career Students in Engineering Design
    Garey A. Fox, Paul Weckler, Dan Thomas
  3. An Example-Centric Tool for Context-Driven Design of Biomedical Devices
    Rachel Dzombak, Khanjan Mehta, Peter Butler
  4. Content Delivery Using Augmented Reality to Enhance Students’ Performance in a Building Design and Assembly Project
    Arezoo Shirazi, Amir H. Behzadan
  5. Interactive BIM-enabled Safety Training Piloted in Construction Education
    Caroline Clevenger, Carla Lopez del Puerto, Scott Glick
  6. An ECG Lab Project for Teaching Signal Conditioning Systems in a Master’s Degree in Mechatronic Engineering
    Francisco Javier Ferrero Martín, Alberto López Martínez, Marta Valledor Llopis, Juan Carlos Campo Rodriguez, Cecilio Blanco Viejo, Yuri A. Vershinin
  7. Observing Engineering Student Teams from the Organization Behavior Perspective Using Linguistic Analysis of Student Reflections and Focus Group Interviews
    Kerri S. Kearney, Rebecca Damron, Sohum Sohoni
  8. Conceptual Framework to Help Promote Retention and Transfer in the Introductory Chemical Engineering Course
    Michael E. Hanyak, Jr.

Flipped classrooms invert the order of the traditional teaching cycle, in which first exposure to the content occurs in the classroom and assimilation of content occurs outside the classroom (homework). Instead, the flipped classroom has students consuming content at home, often through video lectures and digital content, and assimilating in the classroom through problem-solving, practice, microlectures, peer-to-peer interaction, etc. For this special issue of Advances in Engineering Education, we seek papers exploring the effectiveness of the flipped classroom in STEM courses using parameters such as student performance, course experience, institutionalizing of findings, and long-term retention. Papers should be based on sound pedagogy and accepted statistical analysis. We also welcome state-of-the art review papers on use of technology in flipped classrooms and meta-study analysis papers.
As a first step, we invite you to submit an Extended Abstract of a proposed paper to be considered for publication in AEE. As an online, peer-reviewed journal, AEE encourages the creative use of multimedia in presenting results; these might  include videos, audio, links to examples of student work, etc.

Read more about requirements, deadlines, and contact information.

From the Editor

Larry J. Shuman
Editor, AEE
Senior Associate Dean University of Pittsburgh
shuman@pitt.edu

This issue of Advances features eight articles that touch a number of important areas currently facing engineering education. These include student innovation space, entrepreneurship education, “big data” analysis, multidisciplinary capstone design instruction and projects, problem solving and gender, and an innovative way of teaching pre-calculus to high school students. Papers also discuss using a low-cost haptic paddle to teach systems dynamics and an interactive simulator-based pedagogical approach for teaching microcontrollers.
Of note is the lead paper by Craig Forest and a team of colleagues from Georgia Tech that describes Tech’s very creative Innovation Studio – a student run maker space that has developed its own culture. This 3,000-square-foot space was initially founded specifically for capstone design courses, but as the paper describes, the Invention Studio has taken on a life and culture of its own, far beyond just a capstone design prototyping lab. The paper describes the implementation process for the space, including its organization, funding, and challenges. The value of hands-on, design-build education to stimulate innovation, creativity, and entrepreneurship in engineering undergraduates is discussed in detail.

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Table of Contents

  1. The Invention Studio: A University Maker Space and Culture
    Craig R. Forest, Roxanne A. Moore, Amit S. Jariwala, Barbara Burks Fasse, Julie Linsey, Wendy Newstetter, Peter Ngo, Christopher Quintero
  2. Tools for the Large-Scale Data Analytic Examination of Relational and Epistemic Networks in Engineering Education
    Krishna Madhavan, Aditya Johri, Hanjun Xian, G. Alan Wang, Xiaomo Lu
  3. A Case Study of a Co-Instructed Multidisciplinary Senior Capstone Project in Sustainability
    Jinny Rhee, Clifton Oyamot, David Parent, Leslie Speer, Anuradha Basu, Larry Gerston
  4. Assessing an Entrepreneurship Education Project in Engineering Studies by Means of Participatory Techniques
    Leovigilda Ortiz-Medina, Elvira Fernandez-Ahumada, Pablo Lara-Velez, Ana Garrido-Varo, Dolores Perez-Marin, Jose Emilio Guerrero-Ginel
  5. Efficacy of an Online Resource for Teaching Interpersonal Problem Solving Skills to Women Graduate Students in Engineering
    Jennifer M. Bekki, Bianca L. Bernstein, Natalie Fabert, Natalie Gildar, Amy Way
  6. Shaking Up Pre-Calculus: Incorporating Engineering into K-12 Curricula
    Chelsea Sabo, Andrea Burrows, Lois Childers
  7. Haptic Paddle Enhancements and a Formal Assessment of Student Learning in System Dynamics
    Jenna L. Gorlewicz, Louis B. Kratchman, Robert J. Webster III
  8. An Interactive Simulator-Based Pedagogical (ISP) Approach for Teaching Microcontrollers in Engineering Programs
    Shensheng Tang

From the Editor

Larry J. Shuman
Editor, AEE
Senior Associate Dean University of Pittsburgh
shuman@pitt.edu

This is our thirteenth issue – 115 papers published and over 500 submissions. In addition, Prism is now featuring AEE Advances – one-page overviews of important articles in the October and February issues. The vast majority of these papers document a proven “advance” in engineering education, with a few others providing reviews of “advances.” In this way we have stayed true to our goal of publishing a wide range of articles that inform the broader engineering education com­munity concerning methodology, pedagogy, and technology that can be implemented either within or outside of the classroom. In contrast, we have neither sought out nor published articles that primarily describe research studies, leaving those to other journals, especially our much older sister publication, the Journal of Engineering Education. Please see our JEE guest editorial on “boundaries” for a more thorough discussion on this subject…

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Table of Contents

  1. Teaching STEM by Design
    Kristen Billiar, Jeanne Hubelbank, Thomas Oliva, Terri Camesano
  2. Instructional Strategies to Promote Student Strategic Thinking When Using SolidWorks
    Roxanne Toto, Thomas Colledge, David Frederick, Wik Hung Pung
  3. Preliminary Assessment of the Emporium Model in a Redesigned Engineering Mechanics Course
    Masoud Rais-Rohani, Andrew Walters
  4. Developing Globally Competent Engineering Researchers: Outcomes-based Instructional and Assessment Strategies from the IREE 2010 China Research Abroad Program
    Brent K. Jesiek, Yating Haller, Julia Thompson
  5. An Interactive Virtual Environment for Learning Differential Leveling: Development and Initial Findings
    Hazar Dib, Nicoletta Adamo-Villani, Stephen Garver
  6. Animation Based Learning of Electronic Devices
    Aharon Gero, Wishah Zoabi, Nissim Sabag
  7. The AIChE Concept Warehouse: A Web-based Tool to Promote Concept-based Instruction
    Milo D. Koretsky,  John L. Falconer, Bill J. Brooks, Debra M. Gilbuena, David L. Silverstein, Christina Smith, Marina Miletic
  8. Adoption of Technical Innovations: A Case Study of the ASSESS Website
    Sarah Brooks, Shane Brown, Denny Davis, Jennifer LeBeau
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